As Mentioned in Episode 11 – Who Would Win in a Fight

Listen to the podcast here!



Links and Further Reading: UncannyXMen.net

One comment

  1. Gary says:

    I loved your answer session this time around and I have to ask two questions that I hope you would consider for your next time around:

    1) Have you ever considered reading Children of the Atom by Wilmar H. Shiras. Though I doubt Stan Lee would cop to it, this particular Science Fiction book seems to be the golden age precursor to the X-Men. A group of “mutants” from westchester New York, use their mental abilities (i.e. advanced intellect and curiosity) to build a better world, despite the fact that the world fears and hates them. It is notable for being the turning point in science fiction in 1953, where science fiction turned from Space Opera to becoming more about social issues. I thought it might be a fascinating read if you’re trying to find the roots of where the X-Men came from.

    2) I know you didn’t want to do Marvels, but Marvels: Eye of the Camera is a secret X-Men book written by Kurt Busiek. While it is still a documentation of Phil coming to grips with his age, it is also a story about Phil trying to redeem the X-Men in the public eye culminating in the famous speech Wolverine gives to the news cameras (“We may be back, we may not. But Remember Us”). Gave me chills when I read it it again in Marvels.

    3) What do you think of the X-Men knock-offs from other companies? DC had their own X-Men in the form of Doom Patrol (from the original Doom Patrol=Original X-Men, to Mento’s Hybrid=All New All Different X, to Morrison’s “Doom Force Special” with that fantastic list of Claremont/Leifield-style names). DC’s Teen Titans also sort of mimicked X-Men with the introduction of Terra (who was conscious Marv Wolfman rip-off of Kitty Pryde that broke Michael Chabon’s heart when he read it as a child). DC even had their own “Imperial Guard” with the League of Super Assassins who were all “mutants” from different planets. Wildstorm had their own WildCATS (which basically replaced good mutant with Angels and bad mutants with Devils) and the original Gen X (which became Gen 13) and Generation X). Extreme Studios had their own New Men (which was basically what if Cable recruited the original X-Men), which later became truly weird as a proto-Challengers of the Unknown, to the new Bloodstryke). There’s Ex-Mutants (by Malibu), Ennis’s “Fratboy/Sorority Girl” take on X-Men in the Boys, Byrne’s Next Men, and even Claremont’s Sovereign Seven (which is X-Men as New Gods). I’d love to see you guys tackle a few of these homages when appropriate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *